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Tips for Geometry, Coordinate Geometry and Mensuration

By   /   September 25, 2013  /   No Comments

The following table will throw some light over the past trends of Quants section:

Year

No. of Questions

No. of Questions in Quantitative Ability

Difficulty Level

Topics

2007

75

25

Very Difficult

Arithmetic, Algebra, Modern Math, Data Sufficiency

2008

90

25

Difficult

Arithmetic, Algebra, Geometry

2009

60

20

Moderate

Arithmetic, Number System, Algebra, Mensuration, Commercial Math

2010

60

20

Difficult

Number System, Arithmetic, Algebra, Geometry, Modern Math

2011

60

20

Difficult

Arithmetic, Algebra, Geometry, Mensuration, Number Systems, Modern Math

 If we analyze the past trend of quants section, we observe that maximum numbers of question are based from the Arithmetic, Algebra and Number System. The other areas such as Geometry, Mensuration and Higher Math are also common but the number of questions is lower than the rest of the topics. However one cannot ignore any particular topic as far as preparation for CAT is concerned. In an exam like CAT a single question can make all the difference ,so its highly imperative for a student to be thorough with all the topics.

Geometry, Coordinate Geometry and Mensuration are grouped together since they deal with the portion of QA that can be visualized. They comprise of about 25-30% of the exam paper. Of the three, maximum weightage is given to geometry, although every CAT paper will have 3-4 questions on mensuration, as well as a couple of questions on coordinate geometry

Topics that a  students needs to be thorough with in geometry are basic theorems involving triangles, circles and parallel lines. The only things that you need to do in coordinate geometry are straight lines and circles. Given the equation of a circle, you should be able to comment on the centre and radius of the circle and draw it on a piece of graph paper. Similarly, you should know what the slope and y-intercept of a given straight line equation is, and be able to draw the line on a piece of graph paper.

For mensuration, one needs to revisit his/her school level textbook for basic formulae on areas, surface areas and volumes of triangles, circles, cylinders, cones, cuboids and spheres. Mensuration problems are calculation intensive, and require lots of practice.

Geometrical Figures

BASIC MENSURATION FORMULA

UNIT-

  You should be familiar with the following units:

  1. Length: mm, cm, m, km
  2. Area: mm2, cm2, m2, ha, km2
  3. Volume: mm3, cm3, m3
  4. Capacity: ml, cl, l
  5. Mass: g, kg
  • To convert from smaller to larger units we divide by the conversion factor.
  • To convert from larger to smaller units we multiply by the  conversion factor

LENGTH-

 The perimeter of a figure is the measurement of the distance around its boundary. For a polygon the perimeter is the sum of the lengths of all sides.

UNIT-METER

AREA-

The area of a figure is the amount of surface within its boundaries. You should be able to use these formulae for area

 Rectangles- Area = (length * width)

 Triangles-Area = 1/2 (base * height)

 Parallelograms-Area = base * height

 Trapezia-Area = 1/2 (a + b) * h

VOLUME-

The volume of a solid is the amount of space it occupies.You should be able to use these formulae for volume:Solids of uniform cross-section–

Volume of uniform solid = area of end * height

Pyramids and cones= 1/3 (area of base * height)

Volume of a sphere = 4/3(pi)r3

SURFACE AREA

Solids with plane faces

The surface area of a three dimensional figure with plane facesis the sum of the areas of the faces. To assist in your calculations, you can draw a net of the solid, correctly labeling the dimensions.

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